Guide Hate Mail from Cheerleaders: And Other Adventures in the Life of Reilly

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Who knows golfers best? Their caddies, of course. So sportswriter Rick Reilly figured that he could learn a lot about the players and their games by caddying. You never know what the next page is going to bring. Missing Links is the novel that has become a kind of cult classic among golfers, still selling strong after 11 years. These are guys that take the bus with their clubs on their back. A long overdue tribute to dog-meat public courses and the incurables who play them. Eventually, though, Slo-Mo begins to move away from his kind, truthful, polite, and self-effacing ways and gradually learns to behave like a famous athlete.

Jul 31, Angie rated it it was amazing Shelves: non-fiction , 5-star-books. This is the second book by Rick Reilly that collects the best of his weekly Spors Illustraded back-page column. The great thing is that for most of the columns, Reily gives an updated Postscript. I write about p This is the second book by Rick Reilly that collects the best of his weekly Spors Illustraded back-page column.

A few are scathing, as in his acid-laced response to Barry Bonds denying he used steroids "Bonds's records should stay in the books. With a little syringe next to every one". Others, though, are meant to make bigger points "Blind Justice" on the Nets' Jason Williams "accidetnally" shooting his limo driver.

And though it may not be surprising how many columns aim for inspiring-like the story of spirited Ben Comen, a high school cross-country runner with cerebral palsy-it's a shock how many hit the mark "Trumpeting the Father of the Year", "Strongest Dad in the World", etc. Reilly's columns are short but pack a punch;. May 14, Tung rated it it was ok Shelves: non-fiction. While I admit that there are several columns in here that I found inspirational, the vast majority are too predictable, and have already been written in your local paper.

I picked this up only because I needed something to read on the plane home, and I was short on time in which to make a better choice.

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Jun 25, Nathan Mckinney rated it really liked it Shelves: sports , humor , non-fiction , essays. If you were like me as a child and immediately flipped to the back page of the newest Sports Illustrated issue as soon as it arrived then you will understand why I consider Rick Reilly to be one of the greatest sports columnists of all time. This book is merely a collection of of Reilly's favorite columns ranging from '' I found just as much joy reading these columns today, a decade removed from these stories, as I did when they were first written.

One of the things I appreciate most If you were like me as a child and immediately flipped to the back page of the newest Sports Illustrated issue as soon as it arrived then you will understand why I consider Rick Reilly to be one of the greatest sports columnists of all time. One of the things I appreciate most about Reilly, for those of you who are unfamiliar with his writing, is his honesty, and his willingness to tell it like it is, even if he knows it will make some enemies.

I also thoroughly enjoyed Reilly's personal comments that he included at the end of each story after getting some perspective years removed from the story. But in the article titled "The Hero and the Unknown Soldier", Reilly himself summed up why I find his writing so compelling: "I don't write about sports.

I write about human joy, sorrow, religion, and politics as it weaves itself through sports. Jun 22, Cara rated it liked it Shelves: memoir-non-fiction , book-club. I read this for book club and was pleasantly surprised that I liked it for the most part.

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I was really bummed when I realized that I'll miss the next book club meeting to discuss it, though. I even dogeared the stories that I really liked and wanted to discuss! Oh well. I skimmed a few that were TOO much about sports, but enjoyed the majority of them. I really g I read this for book club and was pleasantly surprised that I liked it for the most part.

I really got a kick out of the stories about Tiger Woods and his upstanding character and holier than thou father. I also liked the couple of columns where he addresses reverse racism, which I thought was awfully brave of him. Then, the couple that addressed how fat and inactive kids are today, partly due due to the loss of focus in the schools on physical education. I laughed a good deal during the column about coaching his daughter's basketball team. I also enjoyed Reilly's commentary on politics and the war, probably because my views are pretty similar.

His support of Nothing But Nets is awesome as well. Then, of course there was the MANY heartfelt stories about people that really made the book worth reading. Jun 18, Byron rated it really liked it. I fished this bad boy out of a dollar bin and decided to copp after consulting the Wiki. Come to find out this guy Rick Reilly is one of the all-time most popular sports writers. Who knew? At the time, he was the only opinion writer in the history of SI - the source of this anthology of columns from circa As you might suspect, I don't follow sports very closely.

But I do find myself enjoying some sports journalism I find on the Internets. There's a lot of goo I fished this bad boy out of a dollar bin and decided to copp after consulting the Wiki. There's a lot of good stories in sports. Apparently, many of the best stories of the past 10 years or so either originated or eventually ended up in Reilly's SI column. Of the collected here, I counted at least three that were turned into movies, and several others that I was familiar with from HBO's Real Sports, some other magazine, or the Internets.

There's a lot of really good ones here, but there's also some shit I didn't really care for. It seems like every third column is something that's meant to be inspirational which is just not my thing , or a more or less failed attempt at humor. Your mileage may vary, depending on how much you fit the intended demographic.

Bane of Cheerleaders, Champion of the Little Guys

I got this book because I dabble in sportswriting. Dabble might be too kind of a word.

So, I wanted to learn from what I, as well as many others, consider the best in the business. Rick Reilly has talent in writing, but what makes his columns the best is that they aren't necessarily about sports, but about the people who play them. It is a fantastic angle that works well and can be very entertaining and deeply moving.

This collection of of Reilly's favorite articles is full of great examples I got this book because I dabble in sportswriting. This collection of of Reilly's favorite articles is full of great examples. Some of the stories feel a bit dated especially the one asking "Have you ever seen Tiger Woods do anything wrong? Also, the seven or eight stories where Reilly uses unadulterated sarcasm as the main narration also fall distastefully flat.

But, all in all, it is a good read for those who enjoy sports, human interest stories, and the unique combination that the two can make. May 30, Ben rated it it was ok.

It's hard to picture Rick Reilly's column inspiring anyone to write hate mail. He may purport to be politically incorrect, but when viewed in a compendium, his columns are pretty bland. Maybe a third are mild complaints about an overpaid athlete or a frustrating rule of the game, a third profile nontraditional sports, unsuccessful teams or unlikely aspiring athletes, and the remainder are schmaltzy, Make-a-Wish tales about kids with incurable diseases wanting to throw out a major league pitch.

S It's hard to picture Rick Reilly's column inspiring anyone to write hate mail. Some in this last category are incredibly sappy. Also, many articles, written from , are not wearing well in His columns about Lance Armstrong don't and couldn't mention the doping scandal. Plenty of beating up on Barry Bonds, though, and jokes about John Rocker, 's favorite racist pitcher.

Feb 01, Charlotte rated it liked it. Rick Reilly can certainly be entertaining and funny, but his sanctimony can get old after awhile. He is so intent on telling his readers how to feel about his topics that often the human-interest story is obscured, and his columns become all about him.


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Honestly, give your readers a little credit, Rick. You don't have to specifically tell them that the disabled kid on the cross-country team "weighs 90 pounds, 70 of it heart" or whatever.

I mean, just tell the story and let people react to it. H Rick Reilly can certainly be entertaining and funny, but his sanctimony can get old after awhile. His snarky little "updates" at the end of many columns are irritating as well, and some of them are downright mean. But the man can turn a phrase and seek out a good story, and for that I enjoy his writing.

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Gelf Magazine Bane of Cheerleaders, Champion of the Little Guys

Maybe I should just stop reading these collections of columns by writers I like--could be too much of a good thing all at once. Oct 20, Derek rated it really liked it Shelves: non-fiction. It was interesting to read this book which is really just a collection of Reilly's weekly columns a few years after they had been written. Reilly's a good writer and he's able to identify the coolest parts of the story Reilly's the guy that finds all those special interest stories that warm your heart and make you feel good about yourself.

Of course he's also the guy who at times gets a little sanctimonious when he picks and chooses It was interesting to read this book which is really just a collection of Reilly's weekly columns a few years after they had been written. Of course he's also the guy who at times gets a little sanctimonious when he picks and chooses which athletes he endorses and which ones he vilifies. It's a little disingenuous to continually go after Barry Bonds, but then have Lance Armstrong write the introduction to your book.

Or to heap praise on Tiger Woods as well Granted, their scandals occurred after he wrote this book, but hindsight is right?